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ARTILLERY ORCHESTRA

1 Apr

Pedro-Reyes

Pedro Reyes is a Mexican artist who has been collecting arms from his native country for over 4 years. He uses them to create instruments of social interaction and collective collaboration. In the western Mexican city of Culiacán – a city known for high levels of gun crime – Reyes’ work actually encouraged locals to donate their firearms. Coupons were exchanged for weapons which were then melted down and given to hardware stores. The coupons could then be used at the hardware stores to buy domestic appliances or tools.

His most recent project ‘imagine’ is a collection of 50 musical instruments sculpted from revolvers, shot-guns, machine guns etc. The project lasted two weeks and involved six musicians but Reyes managed to turn an impressive gun amnesty into a fully functioning orchestra with a flute, guitar and drum-kit.

 

Pedro Reyes: Disarm is at Lisson Gallery, NW1 (020 7724 2739, lissongallery.com) until May 4. Open Mon-Fri, 10am-6pm; Sat, 11am-5pm; closed Sundays. Admission free.

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ODANI MOTOHIKO

30 Mar

odani-5

Odani Motohiko is a Japanese Sculptor who creates light, feathery works of art based on sensation and psychological states. He explores the essence of transformation. Some pieces are phantom-like, eerie and ephemeral but beautiful.

For more sculptures visit here.

Federico Uribe PENCILISM

20 Mar

Federico Uribe is a Colombian born conceptual artist known for his use of everyday objects to create colourful and intriguing works of art.
The art pictured is from a project called PENCILISM. From a distance it looks fairly classical but if you get close be careful…you might get prodded by a protruding pencil tip.

His most recent project is called CONTECTADO. For this collection Uribe reuses electrical cables. The result is similar, a colourful mass from a distance, a beautifully textured canvas close-up.

For more of Uribe’s projects, visit:

http://www.federicouribe.com/index.php

Alexa Meade

15 Jan

There’s hope. Alexa Meade is 25 and has never been to art school. Many artists use people as models but Alexa uses them as canvas. She plays with acrylic paint and broad brushstrokes to create a living, breathing oil painting. In a two-dimensional photograph they really do look lifeless and incorporeal but as one of her works of art saunters through the aisle of a subway train you have to concede…you have been deceived. Like The Picture of Dorian Gray, Meade’s bodies are works of art that age and interact and question your perception. She claims that what we experience should not always be interpreted at face value, seeing is not always believing.

For more visit:

http://alexameade.com/

Mark Jenkins

7 Jan
Mark Jenkins -  Embed by tiexano
Mark Jenkins – Embed, a photo by tiexano ]

This faceless figure is a creation by Mark Jenkins, an American artist known for his surreal street installations. This particular piece is from the ‘Embed’ series. Jenkins places the bodies around cities in ways which seem to provoke the authorities. You might see his sculptures sitting on the sides of high-rises, sleeping on billboards or lying face down in a puddle of water. They make you stop and ask the question ‘is that a real person?’. You check under the hood, it’s not, okay. What would you do if it was a person? What makes Jenkins’ mannequin different from the homeless person who sits outside your local shop from morning to night? Well, quite a lot actually but sometimes it must feel as they re no different from a packing tape sculpture. I would predict that Jenkins’ hollowed men get a lot more attention than those with features and the ability to feel.

For more examples of his installations visit:

http://www.xmarkjenkinsx.com/

Shadow Portraits

7 Jan
Shadow Portraits by floorvan
Shadow Portraits, a photo by floorvan on Flickr.]

Tim Noble and Sue Webster use household waste, scrap materials and taxidermy animals to create shadowy profiles on blank walls. The one pictured is called Dirty White Trash (with Gulls).

Jeffrey Deitch, the director of the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, writes:
“Dirty White Trash (with Gulls) is a confluence of beauty and filth, form and anti-form. It is a work of art made out of the process of its own conception, an embodiment of formalist logic. At the same time, it is a negation of everything that formalism stands for…The artist is at the center of the work. It is deliberately entertaining, and revels in its own theatricality.”

The piece represents a cycle. The six months worth of beer bottles and crisp packets, once reformed and illuminated, create a shadow of two smoking and drinking figures. These habits allude to our most wasteful evenings which leave arid landscapes saturated with empty cans and packed ashtrays. So the cycle continues. We should be aware of our waste. It preserves the environment and thus the shadows that exist within it.

Nele Azevedo

5 Jan

These are a few icy soldiers from Nele Azevedo’s army of melting men. The pools of water left by the Brazilian artist have been attributed to climate change but they also allude to the dissolution of the individual. The bodies are perishable like ice caps and are absorbed effortlessly into the stone. The sculptures are not heroes, they’re faceless, featureless men. One minute they’re sitting on city steps, the next they’re not. Forgotten. Stepped on. Lost.
It seems that one figure could potentially go unnoticed but several send a message. They demand attention like a crowd of protesters outside a G12 summit. How long they last depends on the climate so let’s work together. Let’s sit together. for as long as possible.