Archive | Society RSS feed for this section

OGILVY & MATHER

8 Jun

1683085-slide-slide-1-sex-workers-are-mothers

Argentinian Street-Art tackles prostitution. The wheat paste-ups are folded around Buenos Aires street corners as part of an AMMAR campaign. On one wall we see the provocative image of a street worker, on the other is a pram with a few words printed above. “86% of sex workers are mothers. We need a law to regulate our work”. You need to see both sides of the picture to understand the art. The aim is to promote awareness of basic human rights and build a respect for mothers no matter their source of income.

DRAN

1 May

It’s been a while since I’ve seen a bit of art I thought worth sharing but Dran paints pieces worthy of contemplation.

Dran is blend of graffiti, humour and Banksy-esque social commentary. He creates Tintin book covers with anglo-french violence, tourist photos with pickpockets, Papa Noel doing lines of coke and tonnes of other stuff!

Check it out @ http://graffart.eu/blog/2010/07/dran-art-pack-1/

ARTILLERY ORCHESTRA

1 Apr

Pedro-Reyes

Pedro Reyes is a Mexican artist who has been collecting arms from his native country for over 4 years. He uses them to create instruments of social interaction and collective collaboration. In the western Mexican city of Culiacán – a city known for high levels of gun crime – Reyes’ work actually encouraged locals to donate their firearms. Coupons were exchanged for weapons which were then melted down and given to hardware stores. The coupons could then be used at the hardware stores to buy domestic appliances or tools.

His most recent project ‘imagine’ is a collection of 50 musical instruments sculpted from revolvers, shot-guns, machine guns etc. The project lasted two weeks and involved six musicians but Reyes managed to turn an impressive gun amnesty into a fully functioning orchestra with a flute, guitar and drum-kit.

 

Pedro Reyes: Disarm is at Lisson Gallery, NW1 (020 7724 2739, lissongallery.com) until May 4. Open Mon-Fri, 10am-6pm; Sat, 11am-5pm; closed Sundays. Admission free.

Baltimore Love Project

14 Feb
Baltimore Love Project by krapow
Baltimore Love Project, a photo by krapow on Flickr.

As it’s Valentine’s Day and you’re all suitably filled with Hallmark helium, here is a love-themed project from Michael Owen. Not the 33 year old Stoke City footballer who can’t outrun a parked car but an artist who aims to spread ‘LOVE’ through the city of Baltimore. It’s called the Baltimore Love Project and aims to connect communities by reproducing the shadowy graphics on over 20 walls. Billboards with burgers make me want to eat so I guess a wall with the letters L.O.V.E. should make me want to love right? You decide. And visit this link to watch the documentary:

http://www.baltimoreloveproject.com/

Invaders

22 Jan
Space Invader #1 by ultrahi
Space Invader #1, a photo by ultrahi ]

Invader is a French Artist known for his 1978 arcade game mosaics. It’s a simple idea, not as eye-catching as some Banksy installations but just as rewarding when you spot one lurking under a walkway or hiding behind a subway sign. They’re everywhere, mixing a classical technique such as mosaic with urban sprawl. And they’re documented with books and maps so you can locate each invader. The invasion has gone global, from Paris to Mombasa. In some cities, if you manage to locate all the space invaders on a map, they form a giant space invader. It’s fun. It mixes childhood obsessions with art and adventure. It also alludes to the pixelation of our culture. Face time is giving way to Skype conversations and real experiences are substituted for photographs on memory sticks. Pixels is a 2010 animated film directed by Patrick Jean and it celebrates classic 8-bit video games by documenting their invasion of the world. Space Invaders attack cars, Pacman eats subway stops, Tetris blocks fall on to buildings, Arkanoid paddles play against the bricks of Brooklyn Bridge and Donkey Kong lobs barrels from the top of the Empire State. In the final shot, our world turns to a single pixel. The End.

http://www.space-invaders.com/

“This is the official website of Invader. He has no account on Facebook, Twitter or any other social network”.

Mark Jenkins

7 Jan
Mark Jenkins -  Embed by tiexano
Mark Jenkins – Embed, a photo by tiexano ]

This faceless figure is a creation by Mark Jenkins, an American artist known for his surreal street installations. This particular piece is from the ‘Embed’ series. Jenkins places the bodies around cities in ways which seem to provoke the authorities. You might see his sculptures sitting on the sides of high-rises, sleeping on billboards or lying face down in a puddle of water. They make you stop and ask the question ‘is that a real person?’. You check under the hood, it’s not, okay. What would you do if it was a person? What makes Jenkins’ mannequin different from the homeless person who sits outside your local shop from morning to night? Well, quite a lot actually but sometimes it must feel as they re no different from a packing tape sculpture. I would predict that Jenkins’ hollowed men get a lot more attention than those with features and the ability to feel.

For more examples of his installations visit:

http://www.xmarkjenkinsx.com/

Shadow Portraits

7 Jan
Shadow Portraits by floorvan
Shadow Portraits, a photo by floorvan on Flickr.]

Tim Noble and Sue Webster use household waste, scrap materials and taxidermy animals to create shadowy profiles on blank walls. The one pictured is called Dirty White Trash (with Gulls).

Jeffrey Deitch, the director of the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, writes:
“Dirty White Trash (with Gulls) is a confluence of beauty and filth, form and anti-form. It is a work of art made out of the process of its own conception, an embodiment of formalist logic. At the same time, it is a negation of everything that formalism stands for…The artist is at the center of the work. It is deliberately entertaining, and revels in its own theatricality.”

The piece represents a cycle. The six months worth of beer bottles and crisp packets, once reformed and illuminated, create a shadow of two smoking and drinking figures. These habits allude to our most wasteful evenings which leave arid landscapes saturated with empty cans and packed ashtrays. So the cycle continues. We should be aware of our waste. It preserves the environment and thus the shadows that exist within it.