Tag Archives: Art

ARTILLERY ORCHESTRA

1 Apr

Pedro-Reyes

Pedro Reyes is a Mexican artist who has been collecting arms from his native country for over 4 years. He uses them to create instruments of social interaction and collective collaboration. In the western Mexican city of Culiacán – a city known for high levels of gun crime – Reyes’ work actually encouraged locals to donate their firearms. Coupons were exchanged for weapons which were then melted down and given to hardware stores. The coupons could then be used at the hardware stores to buy domestic appliances or tools.

His most recent project ‘imagine’ is a collection of 50 musical instruments sculpted from revolvers, shot-guns, machine guns etc. The project lasted two weeks and involved six musicians but Reyes managed to turn an impressive gun amnesty into a fully functioning orchestra with a flute, guitar and drum-kit.

 

Pedro Reyes: Disarm is at Lisson Gallery, NW1 (020 7724 2739, lissongallery.com) until May 4. Open Mon-Fri, 10am-6pm; Sat, 11am-5pm; closed Sundays. Admission free.

Federico Uribe PENCILISM

20 Mar

Federico Uribe is a Colombian born conceptual artist known for his use of everyday objects to create colourful and intriguing works of art.
The art pictured is from a project called PENCILISM. From a distance it looks fairly classical but if you get close be careful…you might get prodded by a protruding pencil tip.

His most recent project is called CONTECTADO. For this collection Uribe reuses electrical cables. The result is similar, a colourful mass from a distance, a beautifully textured canvas close-up.

For more of Uribe’s projects, visit:

http://www.federicouribe.com/index.php

Baltimore Love Project

14 Feb
Baltimore Love Project by krapow
Baltimore Love Project, a photo by krapow on Flickr.

As it’s Valentine’s Day and you’re all suitably filled with Hallmark helium, here is a love-themed project from Michael Owen. Not the 33 year old Stoke City footballer who can’t outrun a parked car but an artist who aims to spread ‘LOVE’ through the city of Baltimore. It’s called the Baltimore Love Project and aims to connect communities by reproducing the shadowy graphics on over 20 walls. Billboards with burgers make me want to eat so I guess a wall with the letters L.O.V.E. should make me want to love right? You decide. And visit this link to watch the documentary:

http://www.baltimoreloveproject.com/

Alexa Meade

15 Jan

There’s hope. Alexa Meade is 25 and has never been to art school. Many artists use people as models but Alexa uses them as canvas. She plays with acrylic paint and broad brushstrokes to create a living, breathing oil painting. In a two-dimensional photograph they really do look lifeless and incorporeal but as one of her works of art saunters through the aisle of a subway train you have to concede…you have been deceived. Like The Picture of Dorian Gray, Meade’s bodies are works of art that age and interact and question your perception. She claims that what we experience should not always be interpreted at face value, seeing is not always believing.

For more visit:

http://alexameade.com/

Street Art

3 Jan

Every so often a painting on a bus stop or a drawing above a urinal makes me smile. My favourite of all time is one I saw in a Brighton pub. Someone scribbled “I FUCKED YOUR MUM” and underneath someone else replied “GO HOME DAD, YOU’RE DRUNK”. I struggled to keep the urine porcelain-bound.

Street art has great potential, primarily because it’s so accessible. You don’t need to pay an entrance fee or wait for some dawdling tourist to sidestep. It’s everywhere. Sometimes unwelcome, sometimes a joy to ponder while you’re waiting for a bus or marching to work. What’s important is that they give pleasure, wether it be Isaac Cordal’s diminutive sculptures or Robbie Rowland’s Street Signs, they provide a break from standardised, mass-produced objects. A beautiful blot on a built-up canvas.

Here are some links to walls and pavements which should be left untouched:

http://www.isaac.alg-a.org/

http://www.megx.de/#1

http://www.janvormann.com/testbild/dispatchwork/

PAINT RESPONSIBLY PEOPLE!

Phil Hansen – Seize the Limitations

27 Dec

Phil Hansen is an artist who has permanent nerve damage in his right arm. He dropped out of art school because he couldn’t draw a straight line. He still can’t draw a straight line but he uses this inability to create art on a grander scale. He started drawing scribble pictures. Then he worked on a larger scale with different materials. He started looking for limitations and found that this approach to art opens up a great potential for creativity. Through asking ‘what if I can only paint with karate chops?’ he created a large black and white mural of Bruce Lee. He’s created the Mona Lisa using burger grease. During a one year experimental art series called Goodbye Art, Phil Hansen worked with the theme of destruction. By creating art and destroying art in the same moment, he shows that art doesn’t need to be serious, tangible or permanent. He builds an image of Jimmy Hendrix from matches and then lights it moments after. It is forever lost. The Goodbye Art series demonstrates that art can destroy itself. His drawings on banana skins are gone, forever blackened by rot.

 

You can watch a review of his project ‘Goodbye Art’ here:

http://www.philinthecircle.com/goodbyeart.html

ARTISTRY

20 Dec

“An intellectual man is a man who says a simple thing in a difficult way; an artist is a man who says a difficult thing in a simple way”.

Charles Bukowski, Notes of a Dirty Old Man