Tag Archives: Sculpture

ARTILLERY ORCHESTRA

1 Apr

Pedro-Reyes

Pedro Reyes is a Mexican artist who has been collecting arms from his native country for over 4 years. He uses them to create instruments of social interaction and collective collaboration. In the western Mexican city of Culiacán – a city known for high levels of gun crime – Reyes’ work actually encouraged locals to donate their firearms. Coupons were exchanged for weapons which were then melted down and given to hardware stores. The coupons could then be used at the hardware stores to buy domestic appliances or tools.

His most recent project ‘imagine’ is a collection of 50 musical instruments sculpted from revolvers, shot-guns, machine guns etc. The project lasted two weeks and involved six musicians but Reyes managed to turn an impressive gun amnesty into a fully functioning orchestra with a flute, guitar and drum-kit.

 

Pedro Reyes: Disarm is at Lisson Gallery, NW1 (020 7724 2739, lissongallery.com) until May 4. Open Mon-Fri, 10am-6pm; Sat, 11am-5pm; closed Sundays. Admission free.

ODANI MOTOHIKO

30 Mar

odani-5

Odani Motohiko is a Japanese Sculptor who creates light, feathery works of art based on sensation and psychological states. He explores the essence of transformation. Some pieces are phantom-like, eerie and ephemeral but beautiful.

For more sculptures visit here.

Federico Uribe PENCILISM

20 Mar

Federico Uribe is a Colombian born conceptual artist known for his use of everyday objects to create colourful and intriguing works of art.
The art pictured is from a project called PENCILISM. From a distance it looks fairly classical but if you get close be careful…you might get prodded by a protruding pencil tip.

His most recent project is called CONTECTADO. For this collection Uribe reuses electrical cables. The result is similar, a colourful mass from a distance, a beautifully textured canvas close-up.

For more of Uribe’s projects, visit:

http://www.federicouribe.com/index.php

Mark Jenkins

7 Jan
Mark Jenkins -  Embed by tiexano
Mark Jenkins – Embed, a photo by tiexano ]

This faceless figure is a creation by Mark Jenkins, an American artist known for his surreal street installations. This particular piece is from the ‘Embed’ series. Jenkins places the bodies around cities in ways which seem to provoke the authorities. You might see his sculptures sitting on the sides of high-rises, sleeping on billboards or lying face down in a puddle of water. They make you stop and ask the question ‘is that a real person?’. You check under the hood, it’s not, okay. What would you do if it was a person? What makes Jenkins’ mannequin different from the homeless person who sits outside your local shop from morning to night? Well, quite a lot actually but sometimes it must feel as they re no different from a packing tape sculpture. I would predict that Jenkins’ hollowed men get a lot more attention than those with features and the ability to feel.

For more examples of his installations visit:

http://www.xmarkjenkinsx.com/

Street Art

3 Jan

Every so often a painting on a bus stop or a drawing above a urinal makes me smile. My favourite of all time is one I saw in a Brighton pub. Someone scribbled “I FUCKED YOUR MUM” and underneath someone else replied “GO HOME DAD, YOU’RE DRUNK”. I struggled to keep the urine porcelain-bound.

Street art has great potential, primarily because it’s so accessible. You don’t need to pay an entrance fee or wait for some dawdling tourist to sidestep. It’s everywhere. Sometimes unwelcome, sometimes a joy to ponder while you’re waiting for a bus or marching to work. What’s important is that they give pleasure, wether it be Isaac Cordal’s diminutive sculptures or Robbie Rowland’s Street Signs, they provide a break from standardised, mass-produced objects. A beautiful blot on a built-up canvas.

Here are some links to walls and pavements which should be left untouched:

http://www.isaac.alg-a.org/

http://www.megx.de/#1

http://www.janvormann.com/testbild/dispatchwork/

PAINT RESPONSIBLY PEOPLE!

Book Art by Guy Laramee

29 Dec

Guy Laramee carves landscapes out of books. He creates mountains and valleys out of encyclopaedias. He renders printed forms obsolete. His deformation of books alludes to the loss of cultures and devalues vast records of knowledge. Our curiosity and our need to classify things has endangered many cultures in the past. Guy Laramee’s papery prospects promote the beauty of the unknown.

For more hollowed-out encyclopaedias visit:

http://www.guylaramee.com

Dalton Ghetti

28 Dec

Dalton Ghetti is a Brazilian artist who has been playing with knives since the age of 9. Since then he has picked up a chisel and a hammer and has become a master of turning discarded objects into art. He recycles pencils he finds in the street and, often with just a sewing needle, gives them a second existence. By carving tiny figures into the graphite, he draws attention to the fine details. “Small is beautiful” he states.

You can’t buy Ghetti’s pieces but you can see more examples of his work at:

http://www.daltonmghetti.com/